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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Treating minorities like victims won’t help them rise

Posted on January 17, 2022

OpinionLetters
The Enterprise welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be signed with the writer's name and hometown. Include a phone number for verification purposes. Phone numbers are not published. Email your letter to the editor to letters@wilsontimes.com and designate The Enterprise in the subject line or email body.

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The Enterprise welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be signed with the writer's name and hometown. Include a phone number for verification purposes. Phone numbers are not published. Email your letter to the editor to letters@wilsontimes.com and designate The Enterprise in the subject line or email body.

Ronald Reagan once quipped, “one of the most dangerous things someone can say is that ‘I’m from the government and I’m here to help.’”

Considering recent political trends, I see exactly where Mr. Reagan is coming from. Consider this: Mayors in mostly liberal cities wanted to help African Americans, so they defunded the police. Now, in the same cities, African American homicide is through the roof. Some estimate it has risen by upward of 150%, and those same mayors are silent in the face of their grave mistakes. Meanwhile, the mainstream media is complicit by not reporting the surge of crime with the same vociferous energy that they reported police brutality.

Additionally, in this year’s tax forms, there are boxes to declare the sale of illegal drugs and or stolen property and the opportunity to pay taxes on them. Isn’t this a version of the government partnering with criminals? Furthermore, isn’t this a way for criminals to legalize their activity?

Lastly, we see the federal government attempting to help minorities by ending the filibuster, passing sweeping federal legislation over state election regulations and trying to block voter ID. What I find most nefarious and insulting about these laws, as an African American man, is that they have nothing to do with empowering African Americans as much as they do with empowering politicians who are reckless, careless and facetious.

The filibuster is a time-tested way to keep the integrity of our democratic institutions. Voter ID is a reasonable standard to safeguard our elections. To tell me that voter ID targets African Americans, or any other minority, because we somehow cannot get IDs is absolutely ludicrous and insulting.

Minorities must have an ID to get social aid, to get a library card, to enroll their children in school and for any other government assistance. To argue that voter ID is a form of voter suppression is a flat-out lie. African Americans are not victims, and we are able to rise to the standards necessary to keep our republic safe from people who want to see it fall.

I repeat: African Americans are not victims. And we don’t need the likes of communist co-opters to rescue us by destroying our country’s freedoms and checks and balances.

Ken Fontenot

Wilson

The writer is pastor of Bethel Baptist Church and a candidate in the Republican primary for N.C. House District 24.

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