Book of the Dead | The Enterprise
The Enterprise
Login
SearchHelpSubscriptions

Book of the Dead

Posted on November 8, 2021

Unidentified
Pictured is page six of my Book of the Dead, filled with information gathered over the past decade about the body of an unknown woman found in the Leland woods in 1979.

Lindell J. Kay | Enterprise

Pictured is page six of my Book of the Dead, filled with information gathered over the past decade about the body of an unknown woman found in the Leland woods in 1979.

I get asked a lot about the process that goes into writing about unidentified bodies. I often hear, "Where do you start?"

Well, I started many years ago. First, I wrote about unsolved murders then missing people and now my career capstone: The 120-plus unidentified bodies in North Carolina. 

But the work began as far back as 2008 when I first kept files on the unidentified bodies in my local news coverage area. 

The collection of information grew and I started using a notebook to keep so many different cases organized.

My kids call it the Book of the Dead due to its morbid content.

While I have a file folder for each case with autopsies, sketches, news articles and more, the book provides a quick reference for each entry.

It's a good feeling when I can mark IDENTIFIED on one of the pages.

The page I've added here is for the most recent entry in the UNIDENTIFIED series, a woman found in the Brunswick County woods more than four decades ago.

Read that story by clicking this sentence.

More Unidentified

This autopsy report diagram shows where an unidentified man received stab wounds to the head and neck. The body was found in an abandoned Wayne County house in early July 1997.

UNIDENTIFIED

County-line stabbing never solved

By Lindell J. Kay
| November 29, 2021

EUREKA — Stabbed in the jugular and left in an abandoned Wayne County house, the body of a Hispanic ...

Photographer Ed Caram on Thanksgiving Day 2012. He died of cancer less than a year later.

UNIDENTIFIED

Best photographer in the world, loyal friend

By Lindell J. Kay
| November 23, 2021

This week's entry in the UNIDENTIFIED series about bones found at the beach includes a photograph ta...

Surf City police Officer David Beaver holds what was believed to be an 11-inch human bone found on the beach in 2011 in this picture taken by the late Ed Caram, a renowned photographer in the coastal North Carolina area. The bone was later identified as belonging to an animal. Actual human remains that wash ashore are rarely identified, according to authorities.

UNIDENTIFIED

Ocean torso’s identity remains unknown

By Lindell J. Kay
| November 21, 2021

Topsail Island has its share of skeletons. From pirates to wartime submarine casualties, bones of th...


Local News

Powered by Nash & Pine | v4.2.0