$15 minimum wage is no path to prosperity | The Enterprise
The Enterprise
Login
SearchHelpSubscriptions

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

$15 minimum wage is no path to prosperity

Posted on December 28, 2021

OpinionLetters
The Enterprise welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be signed with the writer's name and hometown. Include a phone number for verification purposes. Phone numbers are not published. Email your letter to the editor to letters@wilsontimes.com and designate The Enterprise in the subject line or email body.

Stock photo | Pixabay

The Enterprise welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be signed with the writer's name and hometown. Include a phone number for verification purposes. Phone numbers are not published. Email your letter to the editor to letters@wilsontimes.com and designate The Enterprise in the subject line or email body.

There has been much discussion about raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour. While it sounds good, it is a false sense of equality. Not all jobs are suitable for paying a living wage, and minimum wage cannot be applied universally because there are too many variations in the cost of living between cities, counties, states and the country.

Just raising the minimum wage cannot create prosperity; it would most likely create more poverty. Businesses would have to raise prices, reduce work hours or even reduce staff. Many workers may find they make less due to reduced hours and higher payroll deductions. Besides the rise in cost due to the minimum wage rise, there is also inflation that will drive prices even higher. All of this negatively affects our lowest wage-earners, and we can do better for them.

Rather than raising the minimum wage, we should incentivize companies to provide employee health care and retirement benefits. Structure it so employees paid less than $15 per hour do not have any contribution requirement but enjoy the same level of benefit as all employees. Do the same thing for companies that provide education benefits, so the lowest-paid employees have a path for growth. This will give our lowest wage-earners an immediate raise in standard of living without costing jobs.

Finally, the best way to reduce poverty, make housing more affordable and raise the standard of living is to create economic development that brings career-caliber jobs to a community. To make the community better prepared to move into these jobs, there must be a plan for education.

Beyond specific skills for established businesses, there needs to be a program of basic skills, such as reading and math, to help people adapt to new business workforce requirements. We need to prepare our citizens for future job opportunities, and that will help attract businesses looking for locations that can quickly become productive.

Mick Rankin

Stantonsburg

The writer is a candidate in the Republican primary for N.C. House District 24.

More Opinion

Tom Campbell

OPINION

Keep the kids in class

By Tom Campbell
| January 20, 2022

Omicron is spreading faster than kudzu, especially among our children. Some educators and health off...

John Hood

OPINION

Freedom is worth the risk

By John Hood
| January 20, 2022

During each election cycle, we are treated to an endless parade of politicians extolling freedom. Gi...

Thomas L. Knapp

OPINION

Of pockets, legs and polarization

By Thomas L. Knapp
| January 19, 2022

“For the people who actually study the origins of civil wars, not just in the U.S., but as a class o...


Local News

Powered by Nash & Pine | v4.2.3