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Town code enforcement, cleanup continues


Town officials want the vegetation overgrowth removed from the back of the old Boston Book Company in downtown Spring Hope. Lindell J. Kay | Enterprise

Town officials want the vegetation overgrowth removed from the back of the old Boston Book Company in downtown Spring Hope. Lindell J. Kay | Enterprise

After a little more than a year on the job, Spring Hope’s contracted code enforcement company has looked into more than 180 cases of housing and commercial building violations.



Alliance Code Enforcement began its relationship with the town in April 2021. 

“We’re working for you and with you,” Alliance co-owner Ruth Emery, told town officials at Monday’s board meeting.

Emery said Alliance is working to help bring residential and commercial properties into compliance with safety and appearance rules. Most violations are for junk vehicles and open storage. Alliance employees establish relationships with residents and seek to help them solve their nuisance abatement issues. 

Since April 2021, Alliance has opened 188 cases with 164 of those being abated. Only one complaint turned out to be unfounded. Twenty-one cases are still in progress.

During the month of June, Allied opened a dozen new cases, abating nine of those.

Emery pointed out a few more notable cases.

• 120 S. Ash St. where property owners have been replacing windows and repairing rotted wood around doors.

• West Main Street where property owners of the old Boston Book Company have been making required repairs.

“They’re fixing windows and have mowed the lot,” Emery said.

Mayor Pro Tem Drew Griffin said he’d love to see the vine overgrowth removed from the back of the building.

• 503 S. Pine St. where property owners have had one grant declined and are working on the application for another one to help pay for improvements.

• 508 E. Nash St. where property owners are working to meet minimum housing standards and trying to improve structural integrity of the house.

• 205-207 W. Nash St. where the town has condemned and ordered the demolition of three adjacent buildings.

Emery said the owners of 317 Second St. fixed up the property and have already sold it.

“It looks fantastic,” Emery said.

Alliance currently contracts with around a dozen North Carolina towns.